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Extracts from Nandini Chemical Journal, Sep 2003

POLYBUTYLENE SUCCINATE|ETHYLAMINES|DDT|EMERGING BIODEGRADABLE POLYMER
Highlights of Some of the Articles

TALK OF THE MONTH

ETHYLAMINES - PRODUCT PROFILE
A RELOOK AT DDT
POLYBUTYLENE SUCCINATE EMERGING BIODEGRADABLE POLYMER
FLUORINE CONTAINING POLYMER MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY EFFORTS IN CHINA
CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
GUIDELINES FOR AVAILING INCENTIVE FOR GRID INTERACTIVE SOLAR POWER GENERATION PROJECTS
OTHER ARTICLES

TALK OF THE MONTH : INDIAN PESTICIDES INDUSTRY AT THE CROSS ROAD

The recent controversy about the analysis of pesticides contamination in the Cola drinks has once again brought the issue concerning the use of pesticides into a national debate.

Many Indians believe that analytical results of objectionable level of pesticides content in the Cola is true and real and Cola Companies are guilty of not taking adequate precaution in maintaining the expected standards in the purity and content of the Cola drinks. The very fact that the issue became subject of national debate within hours of the environmental laboratory announcing its results is only due to the fact that it confirmed the suspicion of the public who reacted with considerable speed and anxiety.

As usual, western based Cola companies would argue about their excellent laboratory facilities adhering to international norms and use of sophisticated plant and machinery. Such details would not by themselves be enough to convince the common men and public. Obviously, many in the country think that the Indian lives and health care have been taken for granted.

The real issue is that the ground water in the country is largely contaminated due to indiscriminate use of pesticides, poor disposal practices of waste sludge and effluents by the industrial and economic establishments as well as the households. Everyone is trying to push the waste and effluents out of their premises often untreated and sometimes inadequately treated and mother earth is left with no alternative other than absorbing such materials and chemicals, invariably contaminating the ground water and posing hazards to public life.

Cola drinks are largely made up of water and contaminated ground water contaminate the Cola drinks. Obviously, Cola units inspite of their tall claims about adhering to strict standards have ignored or compromised with standards for the sake of maintaining the production level and meeting the large demand created by huge advertisement efforts.

Cola companies can well argue that they are not responsible for the contamination in the ground water but they are certainly responsible for using it without resorting to the alternate option of stopping the production in the absence of adequate quality of water.

Going to the deeper issue, should be use of pesticides continue or not in this country at the present level?

The argument of the pesticide manufacturers are that the large scale use of pesticides are necessary to maintain agricultural production and productivity as otherwise the pests would destroy atleast 50 percent of the potential crop production in the country. This argument has silenced the critics in the past effectively, who continue to tolerate the use of pesticides as unavoidable evil.

The need is that the government, toxicological laboratories and agricultural agencies should apply their mind a little more and decide to do away at least the highly toxic pesticides effectively such as Lindane, Methomyl etc which are very toxic and whose residual toxicity is a serious problem.

Greater research efforts have to be introduced to develop natural pesticides and also find out whether the use of synthetic pyrethroids can be brought down at least in the case of those crops which do not form part of life line of the country.

The methods of spraying pesticides should also be looked into.

Further, policy decision has to be taken that the pesticides banned in the highly developed countries like USA should be immediately kept under observation and review in India.

The large scale and indiscriminate use of pesticides is the direct cause of pesticides contamination in sub soil, crops and agricultural products and it is necessary to clearly demarcate the level beyond which pesticides should not be used.

For example, in the case of Coal drinks, if the units cannot get uncontaminated ground water, the production of cola drinks should be stopped or reduced to the extent necessary. Nothing would happen if there would be less Cola drinks available in the country, though it would disturb a few multi national companies and their advocates.

Strict enforcement of regulation relating to pesticides industry is absolutely necessary both in the production and usage stage.

Today, surprisingly, despite their lasting effect and the recent public outcry, a large number of pesticides and insecticides are available in the market under familiar brand names, though their use is illegal and the after effect could be undesirable.

MALTODEXTRIN - INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

Indian manufacturers

NAME OF THE COMPANY

LOCATION

Riddhi-Siddhi Starch & Chemicals Ltd.

Karnataka

Rahmath Starch & Sago Factory

Kerala

DSQ Industries Ltd.

Tamil Nadu

Indian Maize & Chemicals Ltd.

Uttar Pradesh

Sukhjit Starch & Chemicals Ltd.

Punjab

Prathista Bio-Tech Ltd.

(Formerly known as Prathista Industries Ltd.)

Andhra Pradesh

Nestle India Ltd.

Haryana

INDIAN INSTALLED CAPACITY AND PRODUCTION

Installed Capacity of the units in operation: 21150 tonnes per annum

Indian Production Level 11000 tonnes per annum

IMPORT/EXPORT

The import/export level of Maltodextrin is in negligible quantity.

DEMAND

Maltodextrin is the least hygroscopic of all corn sweeteners due to its low dextrose equivalent (DE) i.e. low sugar content and exhibit high viscosity and contribute to the mouth feel and body due to presence of higher molecular weight saccharides.

As a multi functional food additive, Maltodextrin is used in food industry such as sweets, drink, beer, ice cream, preserved fruit, milk powder, malted milk, cake, biscuit and bread, as well as in medicine.

Maltodextrin is the perfect instant food additive due to its free flexibility open structure, dispersibility in cold water, its ability to help maintain clarity and eye-appeal. Maltodextrin increases the viscosity and prevents caking and crystallisation in the frozen foods such as ice cream.

Maltodextrin is a more expensive product but the quantity needed is much less than of ordinary glucose. It can be used in products which require increased nutritive bulk without substantially affecting the flavour of sweetness balance

ESTIMATED DEMAND 

11000 TONNES PER ANNUM

SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIALITY CHEMICAL – POLY (3-HYDROXYBUTYRATE-CO-3-HYDROXYHEXANOATE)- (PHBH)

This article discusses the application aspects and process technology as well as Indian import/export trends for PHBH.

PHBH is a biodegradable thermoplastic aliphatic polyester.

PHBH is made by fermentation of sugars from corn and sugar beet and palm oil based fatty acids, followed by a separation that yields 85% to 95% of the polymer by weight..

Procter and Gamble Chemicals ( P & G) and Kaneka Corp(Osaka) are close to deciding on a location for their commercial scale plant to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate)(PHBH).

NEW POSSIBLE INSECT GROWTH REGULATORS FROM CATHARANTHUS ROSEUS

The demand for natural insecticides for controlling major insect pests of agriculture, health and forestry is increasing continuously at the global level due to major demerits of the synthetic insecticides.

So far, more than 2000 plant species have been identified which possess insecticidal properties. However, only a few of these plants have been used commercially due to one or other reasons, to meet the growing worldwide demand for natural pesticides.

Further detailed study can explore the possibility of C.roseus as source of new molecule(s) as natural insecticides for managing the serious field pests.

HERBAL PAGE: WHAT BLOCKS THE PROGRESS OF INDIAN HERBAL INDUSTRY?

The Government of India should be congratulated for clearing Rs.1200 million scheme to support the Indian Ayurveda industry and increasing the availability of technical personnel for Ayurveda clinical practices.

This has raised hopes that before long, the Indian ayurveda concept and herbal industry would occupy a lofty and wide space in the global market. However, this is still not happening.

In such circumstances, the advocates of herbal products and ayurvedic practitioners should consider positioning such ayurvedic products as neutraceutical products in the highly quality conscience international market where they can be mostly prescribed as some sort of health product and food supplement.. The consumers should be encouraged to take herbal products just as they consume food and fruit items, clearly keeping in view that they are naturally grown material with excellent nutritive and preventive medicinal value, so as to prevent the occurrence of dreaded diseases in the long run.

Unless this strategy would be adopted, the ayurvedic/herbal products would be forced to compete with the allopathic products and are bound to lose the race in the global market.

OTHER STORIES

EMERGING GLOBAL COPPER SHORTAGE

Australia's Port Kembla Copper Pty, due to close for an undetermined period, is the latest victim of a global shortage of raw materials caused by Chinese and Indian demand.

More smelters might face closures as they struggle to compete for scarce and costly copper concentrates with the two metals hungry Asian giants, who both benefit from generous tax breaks to help them feed expanding production capacities.

GLOBAL POLYPROPYLENE SCENARIO - CONSULTANT'S REPORT

Polypropylene (PP) market has moved into balance following several plant shutdowns and is in a strong position because the industry has rationalised a significant amount of capacity according to CMAI (Houston).

AQUEOUS FERRIC CHLORIDE: A COST EFFECTIVE CHEMICAL FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT

DCW Ltd., India manufactures Aqueous Ferric Chloride at its chemical complex near Tuticorin down south of India. It is used as coagulating and flocculating agent for removal of suspended solids in water treatment. It also removes phosphate and sulphide also by precipitation.

Ferric Chloride is used for etching of printed circuit boards(PCB) and pickling/polishing of high nickel alloys.

It is marketed in tankers and in HM HDPE barrels. DCW Ltd. caters to Indian markets through tanker transportation and overseas exports in HM HDPE barrels duly palletised and stuffed in container.

OBSERVATIONS ON ESSENTIAL OIL INDUSTRY

India with an annual production of around 24,000 tonnes of Essential Oils is third in the world's essential oils market, which is estimated to have a total production of around 1,10,00 tonnes.

In value terms, India ranks second next only to the US and its share comes to 22 percent thanks to mint revolution in Northern India.

ENERGY CONSERVATION FUSION AND SIZE REDUCTION OF CALCINED ALUMINIUM OXIDE - CASE STUDY

The author Mr.K.Govindarajan, Petchem (E) Consultants conducted an energy audit in an industry producing White Aluminium Oxide and the scope for energy conservation is discussed in the article.

OTHER FEATURES

Government Notification page 
•  Safety and Accidents
•  Certification Issues-Adoption of EU Norms
•  New Round Up – India & International 
•  Technology Developments in Filtration
•  Technology Development – India International
•  Pesticide News
•  Agro Chemical Page – India and International
•  Pharma Page – India & International
•  Environmental Page
•  Energy Page
•  Price Details
•  Tender
•  Figures at a Glance
•  Ask for the Chemical Facts Free
•  Directory Of Chemical Industries In China-Manufacturers, Trading Houses And Promotional Organisations – Part VIII
•  Nandini Internet Index
•  List Of Foreign Direct Investment/Collaboration Proposals Approved By Government Of India During The Month Of April 2003
•  International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code - Part XI
•  Export of Chemicals at Chennai Port from 1.6.2003 to 30.6.2003
•  Book Review
•  Report on Conservation Drive in Oil, Gas Sector

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